Tag Archives: inkheart

RECKLESS Blog Tour: the world behind the Mirrors and how it came to be

I am beyond honoured to be hosting a guest post by Cornelia Funke today. Cornelia is the author of Inkheart,  one of my all time favourite books, which shaped me so much when I was younger. I really don’t think I’d be the reader I am now without Inkheart, so it’s surreal to be sharing a post with you!Cornelia Blog Tour (002).jpg

Cornelia: When I left Inkworld to step through a mirror, I upset quite a few of my readers. Writers should stick to the world they created and feed the addiction they created for that world with as many books as possible! It took me a few years to realize that in fact I hadn’t left Inkworld behind. I just revisited it 500 years later. But….let’s start at the beginning.

I remember that while editing Inkdeath I had grown quite tired of the baroque storytelling this world demanded being inspired by medieval times. There was a sudden longing for another pace, a leaner language, a more modern setting, closer to the world surrounding us. But it didn’t take shape until I worked with a British friend, Lionel Wigram, on a possible movie adaptation of E.T. Hoffmann’s Nutcracker. Lionel was as much in love with the 19th century as I with the 13th and 14th. I blame him and E.T.Hoffmann that I became infatuated with it too – with the century when our modern times finally and irrevocably hatch. When man announces to be god and sets out to recreate the world.

What if….I thought, while we played with Nutcrackers and Rat soldiers….what if there was a world resembling this defining century (maybe around 1860) in which all our fairy tales are historical fact? How would the existence of magical objects, of witches, gingerbread houses and seven miles boots change the course of colonial endeavours, of kingdoms and revolutions?

When I asked Lionel to use the world we had stumbled upon for a book, he gave his permission gladly. With one request: that he’d be allowed to discuss the plot and characters with me, while I’d of course do the writing.

We worked like that on Book 1. We found the first mirror, took the first steps behind it together, working in English and German, the language I still write in. It was an exhausting and utterly inspiring process, questioning the way I approach a story in profound and often unexpected ways. For Book 2 we still had quite a few very inspiring discussions, but by then Lionel’s work as a movie producer claimed so much of his time that I mostly travelled alone behind the mirrors. Since Book 3 the stories are based solely based on my adventures in that world.

In fact I know so much about it by now that I just revised Book 1 adding all the knowledge I gained about my heroes, the Mirrors and the world they reveal. I plan to write at least another three, as so far I only made it to Kasakhstan and there is so much fairy tale territory to explore still. But – stories don’t stick to plans in my experience. And this one surprised and tricked me so often in the past eight years that I am sure I don’t know half of his secrets.


Thank you so much to Cornelia Funke for the great insight into your writing!

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Books About Books: An Infographic

I haven’t made an infographic in a while, so I picked a random topic and played around a bit on my favourite graphics creator – enjoy! Open the image in a new tab for a better quality.IMG_5551

Do you have any favourite similar books, that have fictional worlds within fictional worlds? 🙂

TO BE (RE)READ…

As a book blogger, I read a lot of books: The many I buy in book stores, as well as the titles I’m lucky enough to be sent from publishers for review. But, as blogging schedules, deadlines and looming TBR piles have gotten more and more daunting, what I read can sometimes be a little restricted. Don’t get me wrong – I adore book blogging, and love & appreciate every aspect of it. What I read is always diverse and unique (Every new book is always a different genre). However, there are times when I look at my bookshelves and spot a title I loved recently, or a very old book I loved a long time ago. I’ll often pick the book up, reread the blurb, and maybe flick to a short scene I remember to be particularly memorable. I’ll read a short part then think to myself, I’d love to revisit these characters. 

But, nine times out of ten, I put that title back and go to my TBR pile for my next read.

As much as I’m eager to delve into a fictional worlds I haven’t experience yet, I also find myself often wanting to revisit fictional worlds I’ve loved in the past. Therefore, for every ten books or so that I read from now on, I’d like to take an old favourite and reread it! As fun & challenging as reading to keep up with reviewing can be (which hasn’t been that frequent thanks to hectic coursework things!), rereading will be so fun (and a little nostalgic in cases…) and I’m sure it’ll cure the frequent reading slumps too!

Here’s a list of the top ten books I’d like to reread soon:

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#1: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J. K. Rowling

There’s not really a need to explain this one! I grew up with Harry Potter, but the last time I ever read the series was when The Deathly Hallows was released… I can’t believe that was just over seven years ago. I would love to reread the series, or at least the first book.

#2: Northern Lights by Philip Pullman

I can recall reading Northern Lights when I was a lot younger, in primary school, but I can’t remember any of the plot now – though I remember it being a completely beautiful book. I came across my old toys of the movie characters a while ago, and they reminded me how I should definitely revisit the story!

#3: Matilda by Roald Dahl

Matilda is just one of the many Roald Dahl books I would love to reread again – I was reminded of how magical his books were when I visited the Roald Dahl Museum again over the summer holidays. I just picked Matilda for this list, because it was definitely the main Dahl book that started my love of reading.

#4: The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton

I can’t remember when and how, but recently the Magic Faraway Tree books came up in a conversation and I instantly flew back, in my head, to when my dad used to read these to Six-Year-Old-Me. I really adored them and I would love to reread at least one short story!

#5: Inkheart by Cornelia Funke

As a primary school student, I accidentally picked up my first obsession when I bought Inkheart by Cornelia Funke. I wish there was a fandom for this book. *Scours Tumblr* I’m sure I destroyed the spine of my copy when I read it over and over again between ages seven and eleven. I can’t find it anywhere though, which is sad! As soon as I find my copy I’m definite I’ll be making time for it.IMG_2395

#6: Paper Towns by John Green

John Green’s books are – I’m sure most will agree – genius. Paper Towns ties with TFiOS when it comes to picking a favourite of his books. As I’ve been getting really excited about the Paper Towns movie, seeing all of the set pictures online, I found myself tempted to go back and read the book. I’m sure I will before the movie is out!

#8: The Realm of Possibility by David Levithan

Another Levithan title, also read very recently! This is on the list because it’s not only a book I want to go back to again, but it’s also probably the easiest to because it’s split into short pieces, each from a different character’s perspective. It was really poetic and moving – in fact, I’ve been rereading passages and pages recently.

#7: Every Day by David Levithan

Every Day is one of the most recently read books on this list; I read it in July. Levithan’s my favourite author at the moment, I think, and that was definitely decided after I finished reading Every Day. As soon as I closed the book, I wanted to start again.  I’m not sure rereading Every Day will give me the same experience as reading it for the first time did, but it was a truly phenomenal book and I just want to revisit A so badly!IMG_2397

#9: Marvel’s The Runaways (Vol. 1)

The Runaways is a graphic novel series that I’ve raved about quite a few times on this blog. I just loved it so much! Though I haven’t actually finished the whole series (I think I’m missing two volumes) I would like to read the first volume again. To help cope with my feelings. Because I’m still crying over the most recent volume I read.

#10: Sailor Moon (Vol. 1) by Naoko Takeuchi

Between the ages of ten and twelve, I went through a kind of “manga” pghase – I was totally obsessed with drawing, manga style, and reading manga series including Sailor Moon. Naoko Takeuchi’s books are still an all-time favourite manga, though I haven’t read them in ages. With the recent release of Sailor Moon Crystal, I’d like to reread the original Sailor Moon books, then maybe try the new series!

Wow, that was unexpectedly a very long, rambling post… What books would you like to reread soon?